Friday, November 6, 2009

To ADD or not to ADD



Among all the other things that I have been attempting to do/complete, are some dolls. I saw them the other day, sitting together in their bowl, just waiting for me to bring them to life.  It was one of those interesting things to look at, so I took a picture.  (take a picture, you can stare longer!!)
Last night, in a rush of some sort of misplaced ambition, I wrote a very lengthy post, which I then managed to delete rather that post.  Takes real talent to do that.  Let's see if I can recall any of my brilliant thinking.  I do not drink, so that had nothing to do with it, I promise you.
Attention Deficit Disorder
I doubt that there are few people in this country who have not at least heard of this disorder.  Doubtless there are as many manifestations of it, as there are folks who have it.  I happen to  be one of them.  (Oh look, a chicken!) *with credit to the wonderful folks who came up with my favorite T-shirt!
I have worked in a private practice as a psychotherapist for almost twenty years now, and, probably due to the other fifteen or twenty years I spent working with children as an early childhood educator, have become somewhat adept at knowing how best to work with children who have neuropsychological problems.  That is to say, not just the children, but also with adults who have spent a lifetime without knowing why things are so hard or have been given an incorrect diagnosis.  When I work with children, clearly I also work , or at least attempt to, with all others involved in the child's life.
The rules of confidentiality and ethics keep me from chatting about this in any sort of explicit or gossipy way, but not only can I discuss myself and my parenting experiences, there is an awful lot of general knowledge worth a bit of dialogue.
Having ADD and not being diagnosed until the age of forty (two decades ago, yikes!!!) gives me an interesting bit of insight into the relationship between this and other such disorders and, what else----creativity.
I don't think I have ever been without a few too many thoughts in my head and so, as always, I have lists of things that are worth chatting about.  Here is just one afternoon's partial list:
1/.synesthesia/creativity, and being different.  How do they all work together?
f2. a quote I read by (I think I have the name right): Sunday Hendrickson "If we're treading on thin ice, then we might as well dance." My stupid notes are nor worth a darn... this was a car note, I can tell--apparently the author is Jesse Winchester, musician.
3, Collecting: magazineclippings, stuff that might someday be "media" and so on.

None of this can be done by myself, well I suppose  I could, but it does get boring, so I ask that those of you who do read this on occasion, subscribe, give me feedback and encourage o thers to at least take a look.  Please.


In any case, the more, the better... I am horrible at recalling the correct url, but I think it is still http://sophad.blogspot.com/  Or the sophadavenport is all the way spelled out... You can see I need help.  Blessings, health long life and love to all. s.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

It is scary how often adult ADHD is not diagnosed because children with ADHD have had to find ways to work around the handicaps in order to become functional - often highly functional overachievers - with the result that both they themselves and others around them tend not to realize that there is a problem (or to minimize the problem, if they acknowledge it). Someone near and dear to me used to describe living with ADHD as "slogging through molasses" because just getting basic stuff done took so much effort. Adult ADHD is badly misunderstood by the general population. Thankfully, it is starting to lose some of its misplaced stigma and treatment options are improving.

sopha davenport said...

Thank you anonymous for your comment. I agree with all that you said. As you can see I work in a field in which I make every attempt to make the stigma nothing more than a sad historical fact. It will take time. Given the stigma that still exists against simple situational depression, let alone more serious mental and brain disorders, it will take time. I appreciate your comment. susanne/sopha

sopha davenport said...

Thank you anonymous for your comment. I agree with all that you said. As you can see I work in a field in which I make every attempt to make the stigma nothing more than a sad historical fact. It will take time. Given the stigma that still exists against simple situational depression, let alone more serious mental and brain disorders, it will take time. I appreciate your comment. susanne/sopha

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